As an author and filmmaker, I’ve been quite productive because I dedicate a lot of attention and work hours into my field. I also connect with communities who support my type of work, in order to learn more and network. For filmmaking, this is particularly important as, unlike with writing, making films requires a team – oftentimes a huge one. Just take a look at the credits at the end of any movie.

Sometimes, the work dynamics are not apparent right away. For instance, today I’m working on my feature film with Dr. Stan Williams, a veteran award-winning filmmaker who taught screenwriting and directing at the Motion Picture Institute of Michigan which I attended over a decade ago. You never know how the people you meet will team up with you in the future.

That’s why communities like the Royal Starr Arts Institute are vital to a career in film. They offer you the opportunity to associate with like-minded, like-spirited people where you can share your talents, learn about the talents of others, and possibly find a team for your current or next project. Last month, I interviewed Luke Castle, the president of Royal Starr Arts Institute, which has a free mixer every month and a film festival every year in September.

Be sure to check out the half-hour TV-interview in the youtube video. And check their website for updates given the current situation. https://www.royalstarr.org/

What’s the story behind the Royal Starr Arts Institute? Why and how was it started?

The Royal Starr mission was to celebrate the art of film through the curation and exhibition of works from all over the world, the United States and right here in Michigan. Eighteen months before the first 2016 Royal Starr Film Festival a group of gentlemen met to talk about starting a Film Festival in their community in Royal Oak, MI. After a few months of meeting,they had a name. Royal Starr. “Royal” to pay homage to the community that they made home. “Starr” to honor Orson Starr’s Family, the first manufacturer in Royal Oak. The Starrs made cowbells and bricks, helping create jobs and an economy back in 1840’s. Along with finding a name, the group of gentlemen found their very first Partnership with Paul Glantz and the luxury theaters of Emagine.

What’s your personal background in film and how does that help the Institute?      

I studied film at Full Sail University, but I wanted to stay here in Michigan to help other filmmakers; I believe in Michigan talent. I was a member of the Detroit Windsor International Film Festival before this and wanted to explore my passion for modern creative arts. Thus, Royal Starr was created.

What role does the Institute play in the filmmaking community? 

We are rebuilding the fragmented Michigan filmmaker community after the withdrawal of the Michigan film incentives with consistency, communication, partnerships.

In 2018 we started the Michigan Filmmaker Community Mixer. Knowing consistency would be key to building the trust of the already fragmented community. With the belief that community thrives on face to face interaction to encourage better communication between the fragments of the community, we would hold a open and free event every second Tuesday of the month.

How has your organization made a difference in Michigan’s filmmaking community? Do you have any examples to share?

We understood we had to be more than just a networking event. We had to create viable and real opportunities. From the beginning we offered tables at the event for members to highlight themselves, for casting roles, filling crew positions, and sharing their projects. Driven by our second belief, we are here to create a viable film economy. So we made sure that whoever had a table and were recruiting for a project had to be offering some sort of monetary compensation for the roles or crew positions they were offering.

You have a yearly festival. What are the dates for 2020 and what are some of the things filmmakers should know about the festival? 

The 2020 Royal Starr Film festival will be held from September 11th- 20th at Emagine Theatres in Royal Oak, featuring films from Michigan and all around the world. We love to celebrate with our guests afterward.

What advice would you give filmmakers just starting out? Or those trying to hone their craft? 

Every project you work on is a learning experience and grows your skill set.

Where do you see the institute five years from now? 

I see Royal Starr expanding and offering more learning initiatives, especially during our Film and Digital Media Expo (FANME). In past years, we offered editing, acting, writing, and lighting workshops with leaders in the film industry.

thumbnail_logo

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s